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Welcome to the garden!

Here, you can explore the world of Pikmin with short movies, an insight into the tiny plant-like creatures, fun manga-style comic strips and more!

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Discover the world of Pikmin

New to Pikmin and keen to find out more? You can learn about these miniature creatures here!

Find out more

Comics

Get a comedic dose of Pikmin with these fun manga-style comic strips!

New comics added!

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The Piklopedia

All kinds of facts and creatures from the world of Pikmin can be found in this handy knowledge hub.

Learn more

No Pikmin were harmed during the filming of these movies

Pikmin Short Movies

Enjoy the colourful antics of the Pikmin in these charming short films!

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Hum along with the Pikmin!

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Treasure in a Bottle

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The Night Juicer

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Occupational Hazards

Pikmin 101

Want to know more about the basics? Check out these bite-sized clips that will bring you up to speed on everything Pikmin!

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Pikmin 101: Plucking

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Pikmin 101: Leading Pikmin

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Pikmin 101: Survival of the fittest

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Pikmin 101: The circle of life

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Pikmin 101: Pikmin abilities

Pikmin: What's this?

Ooh, it looks like the Pikmin have spotted something! Can you guess which treasure caught their eye before the timer runs out?

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Guess the treasure #1

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Guess the treasure #2

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Guess the treasure #3

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Guess the treasure #4

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Guess the treasure #5

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Guess the treasure #6

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Guess the treasure #7

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Guess the treasure #8

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Blossoming adventures

Check out all of the explorations you can go on with the Pikmin here with a round-up of available games!

See the games

Pikmin goodies

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Pikmin Origami

Your own trio of paper Pikmin are just a fold away! Download the origami instructions below, then watch the videos and follow along!

Red Pikmin Origami – Head

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Yellow Pikmin Origami – Head and flower

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Blue Pikmin Origami – Head

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Red / Yellow / Blue Pikmin Origami – Body

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Colouring Pages

Brighten things up and spend time relaxing with these printable Pikmin illustrations to colour in.

Digital Wallpaper

Download free Pikmin wallpaper for your smart device and PC as a My Nintendo reward!

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My Nintendo Store

See what Pikmin treasures await you on My Nintendo Store!

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Comics

Get a comedic dose of Pikmin with these fun manga-style comic strips!

New comics added!

Read latest comic

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The Piklopedia

All kinds of Pikmin facts can be found in this handy knowledge hub! Enjoy learning about the many different creatures that you can encounter in the world of Pikmin.

 
Pikmin – tiny plant-like creatures with unique abilities
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Red Pikmin

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Yellow Pikmin

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Blue Pikmin

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Rock Pikmin

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Winged Pikmin

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White Pikmin

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Purple Pikmin

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Ice Pikmin

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Glow Pikmin

 
Terrestrial Creatures – wildlife found on dry land
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Bulborb

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Empress Bulblax

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Albino Dwarf Bulborb

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Emperor Bulblax

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Dwarf Bulborb

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Breadbug

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Giant Breadbug

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Joustmite

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Skitter Leaf

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Skutterchuck

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Pyroclasmic Slooch

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Bearded Amprat

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Groovy Long Legs

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Man-at-Legs

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Puffstool

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Armored Cannon Larva

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Horned Cannon Beetle

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Fiery Blowhog

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Waterwraith

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Lumiknoll

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Mamuta

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Smoky Progg

 
Aquatic Creatures – wildlife found in water
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Toady Bloyster

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Skeeterskate

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Waddlepus

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Peckish Aristocrab

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Puckering Blinnow

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Pearly Clamclamp

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Yellow Wollyhop

 
Airborne Creatures – wildlife capable of flight
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Puffy Blowhog

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Swooping Snitchbug

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Red Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae rubrus

Pikmin are a part of the Ambuloradicis class, which consists of creatures that exhibit both plant and animal characteristics.

A Pikmin will instinctively follow whoever plucks it from the ground, so it is quite common for them to form symbiotic relationships with another species or accept a leader of a different species, as it serves the goal of propagating their own species as a whole.

The Red Pikmin is the most common Pikmin species. It can be identified by the nose-like protuberance on its head and its highly aggressive behavior.

It also has a few surprising and unique qualities—for example, its immunity to extreme heat and fire, despite the fact that it's a living organism. This can be explained by looking closely at its skin and muscle fibers, which are made up of a flame-resistant cellulose.

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Yellow Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae auribus

It's generally believed that the Pikmin body was originally the root of a plant that has evolved over centuries, if not millennia, developing structures analogous to muscles, neural networks similar to those of a brain, and more.

However, Yellow Pikmin possess a perfect resistance to electricity, a force which actually poses extreme danger to other organisms. Oddly enough, this species of Pikmin actually seems to...enjoy electricity! Their flowers even bloom when they are exposed to an electric current. This fact would lead one to believe that their neural-transmission methods are quite different than our own.

This species often uses the ear-like lamellae on its head to soar to great heights and dig holes.

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Blue Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae caerula

The accepted theory is that Pikmin evolved from terrestrial root vegetables, and so would be unable to breathe underwater and subsequently drown. Yet the Blue Pikmin possess a gill resembling a mouth on their head, which enables them to be active underwater. While on land, they leaf and flower like other Pikmin species, and they breathe through the stomata on their skin, indicating they must be naturally amphibious.

Pigment proteins on the surface of their body essentially perform the same photosynthetic process as cyanobacteria, for example, which is what gives them their striking color.

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Rock Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae habisaxum

This species is definitely a member of the Pikmin genus, but its body does not share any of the plant-like traits that Pikmin are known for. Instead, it's composed primarily of stone.

The stone is actually the chosen host for a parasitic subset of Pikmin species nicknamed 'Hermikmin'. Similar to how a seed can sprout and push through the cracks of a rock, the Pikmin's roots stretch deep into the stone, storing its vital organs in an interior cavity that resembles a crystal geode.

Because this species displays characteristics common in parasitism, one could hypothesize that the Rock Onion and Rock Candypop Bud stockpile stone that will eventually host the Rock Pikmin.

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Winged Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae volarosa

The wings on the back of this flying Pikmin species closely resemble the wings you would find on a flying creature. It's possible that an ancient Winged Onion somehow absorbed a flying creature's DNA, which then resulted in the precursor to the Winged Pikmin transforming into the species we recognize today.

If this theory is correct, then Onions might also be serving the role of messenger, transmitting new traits and characteristics to their Pikmin.

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White Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae venalbius

White Pikmin are 'born' through a color-changing process within white Candypop Buds, which only grow underground.

The poison within its body is a type of diterpene alkaloid similar to a toxin often found in certain plant roots. If ingested, it can lead to vomiting, respiratory distress, and complete organ failure, ultimately resulting in death due to cardiac arrest.

Though strong, this poison also has medicinal uses, sometimes going by the name aconite.

The Pikmin are Ambuloradices and evolved from plants, but it seems some species retain more of their plant-based evolutionary heritage than others.

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Purple Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae yokozunum

Slightly larger in size, Purple Pikmin can weigh up to 10 times as much as other Pikmin species, and when thrown to the ground, their impact creates gravitational waves that can actually warp space-time! It's astonishing.

The density of their muscle fibers is also much higher than that of other Pikmin, allowing them to transport 10 times as much weight as their average-sized counterparts. Their rich purple color is derived from strong polyphenol antioxidants.

Like White Pikmin, they are born from underground Candypop Buds, and no related Onions have been discovered so far. But I think somewhere underground, deep among the relics of the past, a Purple Onion is waiting to be discovered.

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Ice Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae habiglacius

Pikmin supposedly evolved from plants, yet there are also Pikmin species with bodies made of ice, known as Ice Pikmin. How is this possible?

The answer to this question lies in the fact that Ice Pikmin are parasitic by nature, and the ice serves as their host. The composition of this type of ice is, predictably, mostly water, but it resembles saline solution with faint concentrations of trace sodium ions, potassium ions, and calcium ions that function as neural transmitters.

Interestingly, the ice exhibits no visual signs of melting or dripping when exposed to sunlight. This is due to its low-temperature core, which continuously creates more ice in order to maintain a consistent size.

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Glow Pikmin

Family: Pikmin

Scientific Name: Pikminidae supravelum

Although they've been named Glow Pikmin, it's not entirely clear whether or not this species is actually a type of Pikmin.

These creatures possess the same fundamental behaviors of Pikmin, like carrying things, propagating, and fighting. They also share special characteristics, such as the leaf atop their head. Yet they do not spawn from an Onion but a Lumiknoll, and they are only active at night or underground. During the day, they revert into seeds and enter a resting state.

What's even more surprising is that they exhibit no signs of life. When a Glow Pikmin "dies," if that word can even be used, it does not expire in the typical sense. Instead, it just becomes a form of light—or perhaps a photon—and returns to the Lumiknoll.

Putting aside my scientist hat for a moment...it seems to me that this creature or entity may not be a living organism at all but some manner of spiritual substance.

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Bulborb

Family: Grub-Dog

Scientific Name: Oculus kageyamii russus

This large organism has the familiar mandibles and cranial morphology of the Grub-Dog family, as well as the characteristic bulging eyes.

As with most Grub-Dogs, the creature's cranium comprises half of its total length and girth.

Showing a scarlet abdomen with white spots, this creature is primarily nocturnal, choosing to prey upon smaller creatures returning to their nests.

Originally classified as the Spotty Bulborb, further research has reclassified this species as the basic Bulborb. Subspecies of varied colors have recently been discovered, but academics are divided into two rival camps over how to handle their classification.

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Empress Bulblax

Family: Grub-Dog

Scientific Name: Oculus kageyamii matriarchia (hypertrophic, gravid)

Initial observations placed doubt on the capability of the Grub-Dog family to support a strong ant- or beelike social structure, but recent studies show the family is capable of such complexity for brief periods when certain external parameters are met.

The egg sac of the largest female Grub-Dog within a given range swells to dramatic proportions in response to environmental changes, such as the sudden depletion of prey species. These females temporarily take on the role of pack matriarch.

Also, in pack formation, it has been observed that nearly all males not involved in species reproduction undergo natural sex changes. The characteristics of such specimens are quite intriguing indeed.

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Albino Dwarf Bulborb

Family: Grub-Dog

Scientific Name: Oculus kageyamii larva (1st molt)

A Bulborb larva after its first molt. Due to its pale coloration, it was assumed to be a mimic when it was first discovered. It was later confirmed to be a true Dwarf Bulborb.

To avoid predation from adult Bulborbs, it spends the majority of the daytime hours hiding underground. It becomes more active at night, when its paler coloration is more difficult to see.

In this state, it is difficult to discern what species of Bulborb any given juvenile may be by appearance alone. It's only after a Bulborb's second molt that they start to display more distinguishing species characteristics.

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Emperor Bulblax

Family: Grub-Dog

Scientific Name: Oculus supremus

The largest member of the Grub-Dog family is normally found burrowed underground. This camouflage allows the predator to surprise smaller creatures and use its long, adhesive tongue to capture prey.

The thick hide and angular hump give the organism a distinct rocklike quality. During the rainy season, moss grows freely on its hump, making it nearly impossible to distinguish this lethal predator from a stone.

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Dwarf Bulborb

Family: Breadbug

Scientific Name: Pansarus pseudooculii russus

Although initially identified as a juvenile Bulborb, groundbreaking new research indicates that this creature is in fact a member of the Breadbug family. A close relative of Breadbug, it escapes predation through mimicry.

Unique adaptation of the Bulborb's crimson coloration allows the species to safely commingle. Such effective adaptation and obfuscation by a prey species is rare, indicating this clever creature is a master of mimicry.

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Breadbug

Family: Breadbug

Scientific Name: Pansarus gluttonae

The adult Breadbug competes for many of the same food sources as Pikmin, but its thick-skinned hide allows it to withstand most Pikmin group attacks.

However, some researchers claim to have observed Breadbugs being overwhelmed by massive numbers of Pikmin and reduced to food.

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Giant Breadbug

Family: Breadbug

Scientific Name: Pansarus gigantus

This gargantuan species of the greater Breadbug family has a torso so perfectly square that it almost seems like it was formed in a mold.

For a brief period after birth, the Giant Breadbug competes for food with smaller Breadbugs, but upon reaching maturity, it seeks out much larger prey. This is the primary reason two species with similar feeding habits can coexist in the same habitat.

Hordes of Pikmin appear to pose the only plausible threat to this massive creature's life.

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Joustmite

Family: Burrow-nit

Scientific Name: Trilobitins reversa

Others within this family wear their shells on their bellies, but this one's shell functions more like a helmet.

Its wings have atrophied into uselessness, so instead it burrows beneath the ground and pops out only to pierce prey with its needlelike proboscis and drain their bodily fluids.

Larval Joustmites remain underground for years, or even decades in some cases.

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Skitter Leaf

Family: Skitterling

Scientific Name: Rus pseudoarbicans

The Skitter Leaf is a relative of the pond skater that shed its wings and adapted to life on the ground. With no residual traits of its airborne past, the Skitter Leaf can neither fly nor skit across the surface of the water.

The wings have since evolved into the leaflike structure on its back, which serves to hide the Skitter Leaf through mimicry. It appears quite effective, as few predators can see through this clever disguise.

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Skutterchuck

Family: Heavil

Scientific Name: Hierodeciderit crystallosum

Its main offensive strategy is to launch the crystal it carries on its back. Otherwise, it's completely defenseless.

In most circumstances, it's a peaceful herbivore whose diet consists primarily of moss. When in danger, however, it wastes no time defending its territory by breaking small rocks and hurling them at the threat.

In order to ensure it has a steady supply of rocks with which to defend itself, it shares its habitat with Calcified Crushblat larvae so it can make use of the shells they cast off.

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Pyroclasmic Slooch

Family: Slooch

Scientific Name: Sulucina vulcanis

A species of terrestrial snail coated in flammable mucus instead of the traditional shell. The creature stays lubricated through constant secretion of mucus so that the fires never reach its skin.

The most fascinating aspect of these creatures is their instinctive ability to avoid causing widespread fires by carelessly brushing plants.

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Bearded Amprat

Family: Numbouse

Scientific Name: Porcellus barbavolta

The hair covering its face works as a capacitor. It charges electricity by rubbing the hair to build static, then discharges it at enemies intruding on its territory. It's more territorial than aggressive, attacking only when threatened rather than to hunt prey.

It has several qualities unique to this ecosystem, such as breastfeeding its young, which may someday give rise to a whole new taxonomy of fauna here.

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Groovy Long Legs

Family: Arachnorb

Scientific Name: Pseudoarachnia discopedes

This species has some remaining organic internal organs, but its carapace and eyes are made up of inorganic material. All 19 of its eyes are actually photoelectric sensors that the species uses to precisely locate its prey.

The gas emitted from the posterior of its first leg joints includes a chemical substance that, after making contact with another organism's brain, temporarily controls that organism's actions. The Groovy Long Legs uses this natural phenomenon, called the "Endless Dance," to make its prey jump between its legs while it moves around in bizarre rhythms.

The entire interaction is seemingly odd for a living organism, but the line between organic and inorganic on this planet is not always clear.

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Man-at-Legs

Family: Arachnorb

Scientific Name: Pseudoarachnia navaronia

This species of the Arachnorb family fuses with machinery at a crucial point in the maturation process, giving it the ability to fire energy bursts from the launcher beneath its orbicular torso.

However, the Man-at-Legs itself is not in control of this weapon. Instead, the mechanical portions of its structure appear to automatically acquire and attack targets.

The Man-at-Legs has a gentle disposition, and as a member of the Arachnorb family, it has no natural enemies.

It is particularly difficult to understand why this species would develop such awesome offensive capabilities, leading to rumors among the scientific community that it was the machinery that approached the Arachnorb and proposed the symbiotic relationship.

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Puffstool

Family: Sporovid

Scientific Name: Fungirussus elasticis

A type of Ambulofungus, the current working theory is that the Puffstool evolved from a more common species of fungus that gained animal-like characteristics over time, including the ability to walk.

When it senses danger, it will scatter spores from under its cap, releasing a hallucinogen that confuses its attackers. The hallucinogenic compound in the spores is only effective against this species's natural enemies, the Pikmin, causing them to mistake it for their leader. Pikmin who fall into this trap are then used as workers to maintain nutrition or defenses for the Puffstool.

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Armored Cannon Larva

Family: Lithopod

Scientific Name: Granitus chukkulinae (larva)

This specimen is a Lithopod larva. Lithopods, like Flint Beetles, use internal metabacteria to aid chemical digestion. These metabacteria can only survive in certain environments, such as within the body of certain insects, so Lithopod larvae do not contain any metabacteria immediately after hatching.

Larvae feed on partially digested ore regurgitated by mature Lithopods, ensuring the larvae obtain metabacteria they would not normally have acquired.

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Horned Cannon Beetle

Family: Lithopod

Scientific Name: Granitus ferrous

Males of this species are known for their hornlike blowholes. When females reach maturity, their blowhole closes and they lose the ability to launch rocks.

At the start of breeding season, the females lay eggs on rocks launched by a male. The rocks then become food for the growing larvae.

Though once mistaken for adult Armored Cannon Beetles, this species is actually a naturalized non-native species that migrated here from another continent.

The Horned Cannon Beetle can breed with adult Armored Cannon Beetles, but only about half of the eggs will actually hatch. This hybrid species has the potential to seriously pollute the gene pool. Furthermore, it exhibits aggressive territorial behavior, sometimes launching boulders at young Armored Cannon Beetles, which has driven the latter species to the verge of extinction.

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Fiery Blowhog

Family: Blowhog

Scientific Name: Sus draconus

This creature expels a volatile phosphorus compound from its snout that combusts upon contact with air. This fire-breathing ability is dependent upon the air-to-fuel ratio at its mouth, catalyst reaction within the expelled compound, and purification of the compound.

Thus it is highly unlikely such a complex process could cause the spontaneous explosion of a fallen Blowhog. (This process is also perhaps to avoid risk of spontaneous combustion in the belly of a live specimen.)

However, one should still treat a Fiery Blowhog with great care during transfer.

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Waterwraith

Family: ???

Scientific Name: Amphibio sapiens

All that is known about this creature stems from a few sightings deep underground. All reported sightings feature the same core set of details: a giant, viscous form with a clear, hazy sheen not unlike hard candy.

One theory holds that it may be the ectoplasmic incarnation of a kind of psychic phenomenon, but as is usually the case with such theories, it is very difficult to prove.

All witnesses report being suddenly overcome with fear upon sighting the creature, approaching a state of panic and near insanity. In fact, every report contains an inordinate amount of extremely vague details, which has led to suspicions that exhaustion and fear have caused some simple natural phenomenon to be viewed as a living creature.

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Lumiknoll

Family: ???

Scientific Name: Collux aeternium

Besides the fact that they serve as incubators and nests for Glow Pikmin, we know very little about the Lumiknoll's ecology.

When nocturnal creatures die, a Lumiknoll can break them down into glow pellets through its strong dissolving enzymes. This matter, when condensed, becomes glow sap.

One might assume glow sap is then an extremely dangerous substance, but it has hardly any negative effects. In fact, I've had it administered to me personally as a curative medicine to break down growing leaves.

Lumiknolls will only appear in places where an Onion was located earlier in the day, and since they propagate Glow Pikmin, one could surmise that they are rhizomes from those Onions. Perhaps, using its dissolving powers, it returns the nectar that supports the ecosystem back to the soil.

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Mamuta

Family: ???

Scientific Name: Hortulanus asymmetria

The imbalanced, asymmetrical arms of the Mamuta are among its most notable features.

Feeding on seeds and fruit, the Mamuta is known to actually sow and grow plant species.

While other species have exhibited seed-burying behavior for the purpose of storage, the Mamuta is the only species so far known to actually cultivate fields of plants.

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Smoky Progg

Family: ???

Scientific Name: Magovum vaporus

The Smoky Progg's body is constantly deteriorating, so collecting a living sample has proven difficult and research into the species has progressed at a glacial rate.

However, by examining the genes adhered to the Smoky Progg's eggs, it has been confirmed that they are, in fact, Mamuta eggs! This discovery allows for the possibility that Mamuta that do not develop properly and hatch become Smoky Proggs.

If, hypothetically, a Mamuta were to remain above ground at night and absorb glow sap, that might impact the nutrient levels within its egg's yolk. That change could lead to the embryo's inviability or break down its enzymes, then...maybe...

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Toady Bloyster

Family: Mollusking

Scientific Name: Molluschid minionicus

This species of creature has yet to complete its evolution from Bloomcap Bloyster to the more advanced Ranging Bloyster. Compared to the latter, this creature is substantially smaller.

The fact that its mandibles do not protrude as significantly as the Ranging Bloyster's is due in part to the fact that like most mollusks, its vital organs are located deep within the creature's carapace.

The flowerlike appendage on its back is actually a gill. It prefers a watery habitat from which it can capture unsuspecting small prey with its sticky tendrils.

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Skeeterskate

Family: Spitterspatter

Scientific Name: Gerridus clavomacula

It skates on water at high speed thanks to tiny hairs on the tips of its feet. These hairs are coated in an ultra-hydrophobic substance to minimize friction against the water's surface.

Its long proboscis functions as a straw to take in water, which is stored in a reservoir in its head, as well as to spout it as a weapon against small insects. While taking in water, it also takes in microscopic plankton, meaning that its prime means of defense is also a feeding mechanism.

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Waddlepus

Family: Flobbler

Scientific Name: Opisteuthidae iaciobulla

Its eyes and stubby feet make it look like an octopus, hence the name. But it's closer in anatomy to a starfish.

It sleeps during the day but will stay alert for approaching predators, which it drives off by puffing itself up and releasing bubbles. Closer research suggests that the true purpose for the bubbles is to protect its eggs during spawning season.

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Peckish Aristocrab

Family: Onionshell

Scientific Name: Brachyurices esurio

Its unnaturally large claw is used for catching prey, for self-defense, and most surprisingly, for its mating call. Most aspects of the Aristocrab's life revolve around it, which may explain why they become fearful and docile when the claw is damaged. It would also account for the claw's remarkable regenerative capabilities, which can restore it completely in a single night.

It is also known to blow bubbles when under attack, but this is a result of it venting from the wrong discharge valve when under extreme stress.

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Puckering Blinnow

Family: Elips

Scientific Name: Narrolingus piscatum

Many assume it's undeveloped due to its large eyes and lack of fins, but this is simply its normal, fully grown form. Though its dorsal and ventral fins have atrophied, the long caudal fin helps to compensate for this.

It can leap high enough out of water to catch low-flying prey. The scales comprising the round patches along the sides are known to turn light pink during breeding season.

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Pearly Clamclamp

Family: Snareshell

Scientific Name: Ostrum mandimuscae

Using the pearl that takes shape inside its body as bait, this creature lures prey into its interior and traps it within its shell to feed. It's also worth noting that this pearl may just be an amalgamation of outside materials wrapped in a viscous gelatin exterior.

On the frequent occasions when it cannot gather food for itself, this creature can also obtain nutrients when the symbiotic algae within its body photosynthesizes. For this reason, it can often be found with its mouth open on shoals or sandy beaches that get a lot of sunshine.

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Yellow Wollyhop

Family: Amphituber

Scientific Name: Amphicaris frondiferorum

This magnificent specimen has remarkably bright coloration compared to the rest of the Amphituber family, as well as three lateral spots.

This species seems to have lost some swimming proficiency with the evolutionary adaptation that granted it greater jumping ability.

The Yellow Wollyhop inhabits aquatic shallows and shows an instinctive drive to jump upon and squash smaller creatures.

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Puffy Blowhog

Family: Blowhog

Scientific Name: Sus inflata

This species of Blowhog uses internally generated hydrogen to inflate a flotation bladder and hover above the ground. The creature's electrified pulse creates a sash of color that flows along the surface of its body, making it a particularly beautiful species in the Blowhog family.

Precisely how it is able to internally stabilize its highly explosive hydrogen and simultaneously generate electricity remains a mystery.

The Puffy Blowhog blows leaves and grass around to eat the insects underneath. It maintains midair buoyancy by using its fins and releasing air through blowholes. This enables it to float effortlessly, even in the breeze.

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Swooping Snitchbug

Family: Scarpanid

Scientific Name: Scarpanica kesperens

The Scarpanids originally lived on the ground, sporting poorly developed vestigial wings. This species developed enlarged antennae that can be used as makeshift wings.

Scarpanids are attracted by the sight of large groups of Pikmin in cavalry formation and will swoop down to seize them. However, Scarpanids do not eat Pikmin, and they will drop any seized Pikmin after a short time.

The reason for this behavior is unknown, but I look forward to future research in the area.

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